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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 36: Brain-Healthy Eating

“Today Show” nutritionist Joy Bauer has easy, affordable, and delicious tips for making brain-healthy food choices. Boost your memory, strengthen your focus, and improve your blood flow by following Joy’s simple advice. Plus, the surprising benefits of coffee, and the 3 golden rules of snacking.   Dr. Stieg: I’m really happy to have Joy Bauer with […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 35: Teen Brains at Risk

Dr. Frances Jensen, Chair of the Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and author of “The Teenage Brain,” explains how vaping, binge drinking, and pot smoking are especially dangerous for adolescent brains. Young adults are more susceptible to addiction, cognitive impairment, and mental health issues when exposed to such substances because […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 34: Hope for Depression’s Toughest Cases

Anti-depressants don’t work for everyone. Psychiatrist Conor Liston, MD, PhD, describes four effective treatments that restore the brain’s lost connections and repair the cellular changes that cause depression. Magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation, electroconvulsive therapy, and low-dose ketamine (“Special K”) have all been shown to relieve the symptoms of clinical depression and correct the functional […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 33: Scientific Advances in Mind Reading

Artificial intelligence is ushering in a new era of mind reading, with advanced brain scans revealing much of what we’re thinking about. Dr. Marvin Chun, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Yale, explains how researchers in his lab are using fMRI and other new technologies to see what’s going on in your brain, even as […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 32: Why the Burnout Epidemic

Frayed social bonds, toxic and demanding work environments, and even helicopter parenting are all contributing to an American epidemic of burnout. Dr. Richard Friedman, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Director of the Student Mental Health Program at Weill Cornell Medical College, explains how we can better deal with everyday adversity, stress, and discomfort without succumbing […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 31: Living with Glioblastoma

New York Times journalist Rod Nordland is confronting his glioblastoma diagnosis with positivity, not despair. In this inspiring episode, he speaks with Dr. Stieg about coming to terms with the disease, what it’s like to live with his everyday challenges, and why he hasn’t shed a tear over it. Dr. Stieg: Hi, this is Dr. Phil […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 30: What You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer’s

Dr. Richard Isaacson, Director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine, shares the just-published results of his groundbreaking clinical trial which show that a personalized prevention plan can dramatically lower the risk or progression of Alzheimer’s. Also joining the discussion is one of Dr. Isaacson’s patients who is living proof that this new […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 29: Violence and the Brain

Mass shootings, bullying and retaliation, and other acts of violence — why did the human brain evolve to be so aggressive? Dr. Heather Berlin, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine, talks about the genetics of violence, the “mean girl” phenomenon, and why some psychopaths end up in jail while others land […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 28: Slow Love

How have sexual behaviors changed in our Millennial, #MeToo era? Biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, PhD, explains the nuances of being just friends, friends with benefits, or a casual hookup — and tells us how the trend toward longer courtships may change everything. Dr. Stieg: We are here today with Dr. Helen Fisher. She is one […]

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Podcast Season 1

S1 Episode 27: Is it Normal Aging, or Alzheimer’s

Some 46 million Americans already have the early brain changes that are the harbingers of a dementia that won’t reveal itself for decades. Dr. Richard Isaacson, Director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine, talks about the three stages of cognitive impairment, how to distinguish “senior moments” from symptoms of dementia, and whether […]